5 Advanced Climbing Tips to Take You to the Next Level

Thanks to MRI technology, scientists have learned that no one is immune to the adrenaline rush action that movies give us. With the upcoming release of Free Solo, the documentary about Alex Honnold climbing up one of the world’s most famous rocks, more people are going to be excited about rock climbing.

Whether you’re new to the sport or well-seasoned, there’s always room for improvement. If you want to take your skills to the next level, keep reading to learn five rock climbing techniques you should know about.

Rockin’ Techniques

1. Head Jam

One of the most crafty climbing tips is to use your head. While you should be strategizing every move up, we mean physically use your head.

You don’t have to rely on your arms and legs to propel you upward.

If you find yourself in a tricky spot with a ledge or substantial overhang above you, press your head into the crevice to free your hands. While balancing with your neck and legs, you can reach for the next move.

2. Mantling

Mantling is one of the many advanced rock climbing techniques that even professionals struggle to pull off. This move is helpful for when you’re approaching a surface that is flat, like a summit.

To execute this move, you need to be able to place both hands facing downward on a flat surface. Next, bend your elbows and propel yourself up as if you were trying to get out of a pool with no ladder.

Beginners can kick their leg up and use that momentum to top out.

3. Rock Climbing Techniques to Build Forearm Strength: Gaston

Most climbers keep their hands pointed up. The Gaston technique spices things up by shifting hand placement 90 degrees so your fingers are pointed toward your heart and your elbows are facing out.

This grip is most helpful for navigating technical spots on the climb where footholds are sparse.

Extreme gastons can end with the fingers pointed all the way down. This exercise is excellent for toning your forearms, but it will zap your energy away fast.

Make sure you’re always secure with strong climbing hooks whenever you attempt new techniques.

4. Dyno

The dyno is a move that can make you feel as graceful as a monkey swinging high in the treetops. It’s fast-paced and relies on your entire body being in sync.

Mostly, your legs have to push off their footing hard while your arms stretch up to the next hold. For an instant, you’ll be flying in the air.

This power move should be used when the distance between your current position and next position is too far to reach by stretching.

5. Assisted Foot Lift

The assisted foot lift is exactly what it sounds like. In this move, you use your hand as leverage to pull your leg up higher than it could stretch on its own. The more flexible your hips and joints are, the easier this move will be.

If you spot a great foothold that is waist-high, you can give your foot a boost by using one hand to grab it and lift it to the foothold. You’ll be surprised by how much further you can stretch when you use your arm strength to assist.

Ready to Enjoy Your Most Exciting Climb Yet?

If you want to put your rock climbing techniques to the test, try out the new Sensa. This shoes can take the beating of all kinds of climbing terrains and suit the needs of any climber.

Find out more about the other climbing footwear we carry and check out our online shop!

 

Ambassador Spotlight | Irene Yee

Hometown: Las Vegas, NV

Q: What’s your climbing style?
A: Beached Whale Will Power

Q: What is your proudest accomplishment in climbing, and outside of climbing?
A: My proudest accomplishment in climbing so far was putting up a first ascent off-width climb I named Llamacorn. It was never something I even thought I could accomplish, but I found that impossible mythical beast! Outside of climbing my proudest accomplishment has been toasting and finishing off an entire bag of strawberry marshmallows in one night with Ashley Cracroft.

 

Q: What advice would you give to your first year climbing self?
A: Never lose your psyche. When the climbing gets too frustrating, go climb something for fun and remember why you fell in love in the first place.

Q: Who do you take advice from and why?
A: Everyone. It’s about expanding your worldview, though having a strong filter is key. Advice is a personal choice, and you have to realize you may or may not agree with everyone’s choices.

Q: How has your training for climbing changed in the last year?
A: I have made a move to focus on things that are non-climbing but will ultimately help with climbing in the end. Running and fitness classes train a lot of things climbing tends to leave out, endurance, strong legs, and overall fitness. I’m not training to climb 13’s I’m training so I can climb for the rest of my life.

Q: How has climbing affected the people you choose to surround yourself with?
A: I surround myself with more people! Climbing has been a social outlet for me, it has created such a wonderful community that no matter where you are if you meet a climber you know you can interact.

 

Q: What have you done to give back to the climbing community?
A: I give photos to the climbing community. I share to show that there is a multitude of people who all found the joy of climbing, and so we can all revel in the wonderful crag day, the 5.8 send or the 5.14 send. I also volunteer with my local climbing organization and refill WagBag boxes in my climbing area, its the least I can do on my way to the crag, pack it in so you can pack it out!

Q: What have you learned from failure?
A: Failing is easy, choosing to get back up and keep going is the hard part. Sometimes the task seems impossible, but it is the most I’ve ever learned about myself, it is those times where I learn just how strong I am.

Q: Who are the climbers that inspire you the most, and why?
A: My friends!!! Nothing inspires me more than seeing those I know best accomplish goals beyond their own belief. You get to be a part of that experience and nothing moves me more than a crag day with my friends.

Q: What is your favorite climbing location, and why?
A: Vedauwoo, WY. It’s been my favorite for a while now. I love the style of climbing, the camping, and the hurt of being shut down again and again and again…yeah…oh and the Rec Center has a waterslide.

Q: Why Butora Climbing?
A: Because they agreed to take on a normal person like me and the Altura is proving to be a superior off-width shoe.

 

 

Q: What are your favorite before and after climbing meals?
A: Before, donuts; After, Ice cream. I mean there’s a bunch of other stuff in between, but if I had a choice they would always be bookended with those two things.

Q: What is your spirit animal?
A: A Llamacorn. Weird, yet magical.

 

Questions from the Internet

These are questions our visitors have asked.

 

Q: What differences have you found in climbing Narsha versus climbing in Acro?
A: I’ll let you know when the sport climbing starts back up in my life.

Q: What are some tips you would give to new outdoor climbers about crag etiquette?
A: You’re a good person in life why would it be any different at the crag? Be polite in trying to accomplish your goals for the day, ask if you’re not sure, clean up after yourself. You wouldn’t poop on the floor of your house, why would you poop on the trail?

 

Q: Tips you would give to someone who is stuck on their project? How do you stay motivated when you are stuck?
A: When you find out please let me know. Though I do find some time away can always be helpful. Sometimes your mind gets too used to a problem that it shuts out different possibilities. You focus on your inability to do the problem rather than opening your mind to new possibilities to complete the problem.

 

Ambassador Spotlight | Brynn Keenan

Brynn Keenan

Hometown: Charleston, South Carolina

Q: What’s your climbing style?
A: Bouldering

Q: What is your proudest accomplishment in climbing, and outside of climbing?
A: Doing The Amendment in the middle of winter. It felt like a pretty epic accomplishment – I spent a lot of time alone scrubbing snow off the top of that boulder, dropped all of my crash pads into Boulder Falls trying to hike to it after a big storm, and finally sent it on the one weekend day above freezing in January. It was equal parts physically and mentally challenging.

Outside of climbing I really love my job (quality manager for Left Hand brewing), enjoy running long distance, mountain biking, and recently built out a van. I take a lot of pride in progressing in climbing while balancing those other elements of life!

Q: What advice would you give to your first year climbing self?
A: If something hurts, STOP! It took me years to accept that when a muscle or tendon isn’t feeling quite right, climbing through it will put you further back in the long run.

Also, past Brynn, those cargo shorts were not cool. Seriously, wear literally anything else.

Q: Who do you take advice from and why?
A: I’m happy listen to advice from anyone willing to give it. Everyone’s perspective is valuable when you weigh it with your own experience and intuition.

Q: How has your training for climbing changed in the last year?
A: I’ve diversified my training quite a bit this year – running to stay fit, doing less weighted exercises and more ergonomic training. I’ve been focusing more on steady progression that feels natural, and less on high intensity weighted stuff.

Q: How has climbing affected the people you choose to surround yourself with?
A:Climbing is such an amazing community of people, and has ultimately shaped the group I surround myself with. It’s such a way of life that it really connects people all around the world who’d otherwise have never met.

Brynn Keenan Bouldering

Q: What have you done to give back to the climbing community?
A: I’ve coached youth teams and lead trips to help get folks into the sport, but I think the biggest way I’ve given back is being open and helpful to newer climbers. Especially in Boulder climbing can be pretty intimidating, and a friendly face at the gym goes a long way.

Q: What have you learned from failure?
A: There’s always another angle, and you just have to get creative to find it. Failure is powerful when it’s turned into motivation.

Q: Who are the climbers that inspire you the most, and why?
A: I really admire climbers who are dedicated to climbing at a high level, but maintain a sense of humility. It really connects with what makes the climbing community so special.

Q: What is your favorite climbing location, and why?
A: Anywhere in the South East – The New River Gorge, Rocktown, and LRC to name a few. It just doesn’t get better than bullet sandstone and southern hospitality.

Q: Why Butora Climbing?
A: Butora is a great company, that produces amazing shoes, and gives back to the community. I’ve been climbing for 15 years, and have owned a laundry list of climbing shoes. It’s been 2 years with the Acro now, and I think it’s the perfect hybrid of performance and comfortability.

Brynn Keenan Bouldering

Q: What are your favorite before and after climbing meals?
A: Favorite meal: Pizza for all of the occasions, but what I actually eat is a lot of stir-fry with brown rice, veggies, and protein.

Favorite during climbing: I like anything as long as it’s real food, but what I actually eat is whatever energy bar I find in my climbing pack because I forgot my food.

Q: What is your spirit animal?
A: Narwhalicorn 🦄

 

Questions from the Internet

These are questions our visitors have asked.

 

Q: What differences have you found in climbing Narsha versus climbing in Acro?
A: I find that the Acro is a good balance between aggressive and flexible – it translates really well from steeps to face climbing and everything in between. The Narsha is a bit stiffer and pulls through during those time when you need a pretty aggressive downturned shoe.

Q: What are some tips you would give to new outdoor climbers about crag etiquette?
A: Chalk your hands before touching the holds, It keep the holds from getting as greasy.

Maybe this is just me, but I also think it’s nice to say hi to everyone when you roll up to a boulder that other people are working on. On the other side when you leave it’s polite to ask if anyone wants one more burn before pulling your pads out of the pile.

Brynn Keenan Bouldering

Q: Tips you would give to someone who is stuck on their project? How do you stay motivated when you are stuck?
A: Try bringing new people out to mix it up, maybe they’ll come up with beta that you didn’t see and bring new psyche. For low percentage moves, work that one move, then move outwards – once you get it, keep adding one more move beforehand until it’s linked from the beginning. If you just can’t seem to do the move, try taking a break and training for it.

Q: How have you overcome fear in climbing (fear of falling, fear of failure, etc.)?
A: I broke my back in Bishop when I was 22, and couldn’t climb for a year. When I came back I was pretty paralyzed with fear for a long time, and all I can say is try to find the balance between healthy and unhealthy fear. For me, that means evaluating all of the potential risks, what the consequences are, and eventually deciding if it’s worth it. If you aren’t afraid to say no, the fear will take care of itself when you decide that it’s something that you really want.

Butora Acro Rock Climbing Shoes

Ambassador Spotlight | Robyn Ragins

Butora Climbing Ambassador Robyn Ragins

Hometown: Chicago, IL

Q: What’s your climbing style?
A: Sport & Bouldering

Q: What is your proudest accomplishment in climbing, and outside of climbing?
A: Sending Kaleidoscope 13c at the Red River Gorge. And winning the Young Gun Rookie Team Award for community service achievements.

Q: What advice would you give to your first year climbing self?
A: Go on an outdoor climbing trip as soon as possible.

Q: Who do you take advice from and why?
A: My coaches and my closest friends because they always have my best interest at heart.

Q: How has your training for climbing changed in the last year?
A: I had a big change in my training while switching from being on a youth team to coaching one. I now train alone most days and am in charge of my own training plan.

 

Q: How has climbing affected the people you choose to surround yourself with?
A: I am mostly around climbers, considering my family climbs, I work with climbers and I climb, so I spend lots of hours in the gym. I love the Chicago climbing community and all the people who make every day more fun. Alternatively, my non climbing friends need to be very understanding people because, I spend so much time training and not with them.

Q: What have you done to give back to the climbing community?
A: When I left competitive youth climbing I started coaching and volunteering at events in order to give back to the biggest part of my youth. I have also participated in clean up days at the Red River Gorge, my home crag.

Q: What have you learned from failure?
A: Failure is good, it means that I tried hard enough and hopefully put in all my effort to surpass my comfort zone. After failure I learn what went wrong and how to improve myself for the next try.

Butora Climbing Ambassador Robyn Ragins

Q: Who are the climbers that inspire you the most, and why?
A: MIchaela Kiersch inspires me the most because she was able to do her best competitive and outdoor climbing all while being an exceptional college student.

Q: What is your favorite climbing location, and why?
A: Rodellar, Spain is my favorite crag because I love the long, endurance, tufa climbs. But also the community there is amazing because the climber town is so small and there are always people hanging out at the sectors.

Q: Why Butora Climbing?
A: Butora came into the climbing shoe scene a little late but, they tried and believed in their product and made an impact in the industry. I love the comfortable fit of the shoes that are still aggressive and great for all types of climbing.

Q: What are your favorite before and after climbing meals?
A: Eggs or yogurt before climbing and Tacos after!

Q: What is your spirit animal?
A: A meerkat.

Butora Climbing Ambassador Robyn Ragins

Questions from the Internet

These are questions our visitors have asked.

 

Q: What differences have you found in climbing Narsha versus climbing in Acro?
A: The narsha has a much finer edge that is very helpful while also being an aggressive shoe, making it very versatile for style and great for outdoors. The acro is super comfy and aggressive, which is why it is my favorite all around gym shoe.

Q: What are some tips you would give to new outdoor climbers about crag etiquette?
A: Keep your stuff condensed to one area, don’t leave your belongings all over the crag. Also don’t play music or be extremely loud if others are around.

Butora Climbing Ambassador Robyn Ragins

Q: Tips you would give to someone who is stuck on their project? How do you stay motivated when you are stuck?
A: Projecting is all about staying psyched on something that you couldn’t do quickly. It takes work to project, lots of tries and energy. Positive thinking is a must, stay happy and confident in your abilities. Also, take a break and climb some other things every once in a while so you’re not bored.

Q: How have you overcome fear in climbing (fear of falling, fear of failure, etc.)?
A: I was afraid of trying hard grades that push my limits on outdoor climbs because I didn’t want to fall or find out that my limit was lower than I wanted it to be. So I found a climbing partner who I trusted and who supported me, so I was able to be confident in whatever I tried.

Butora Acro Rock Climbing Shoes

Ambassador Spotlight | David Anderson

David Dave Anderson

Hometown: Woodinville, WA (or where ever our van, Magic, is parked)

Q: What’s your climbing style?
A: Alpine Rock First Ascents, Trad, Sport, Indoor Bouldering, Ice, Mixed, Aid

Q: What is your proudest accomplishment in climbing, and outside of climbing?
A: In 2015 my wife Szu-ting Yi and I climbed a new alpine rock route, Secret Moon Cake, on Eagle Peak East (5.10 R, 17,388ft) in Western China. The route took all of our combined skills to access and climb the peak in very challenging weather conditions. http://publications.americanalpineclub.org/articles/13201213642/Eagle-Peak-East-Secret-Moon-Cake,

Q: What advice would you give to your first year climbing self?
A: Bouldering in the cornerstone for improvement in all types of climbing

Q: Who do you take advice from and why?
A: My wife Szu-ting Yi, no explanation needed 🙂

Q: How has your training for climbing changed in the last year?
A: More finger-board and indoor bouldering sessions

Q: How has climbing affected the people you choose to surround yourself with?
A: Climbing has been my lifelong vocation, personal pursuit and connected me with my life partner. Climbing, with it’s mental and physical challenges, quickly reveals who we are as people. You can’t fake climbing , it cuts through the “BS” that people sometimes surround themselves with in life. As a result, climbing has made me appreciate people, who are thoughtful, honest, direct and kind under any circumstance.

Q: What have you done to give back to the climbing community?
A: I have been an outdoor educator and climbing instructor for the last 30 years. I have been fortunate to be able to impart my knowledge in both climbing movement and technical systems to thousands of new climbers. However, teaching people about protecting the climbing resource/environment and seeing how people gain confidence and pride in themselves through climbing has been the biggest reward.

Q: What have you learned from failure?
A: Failure is a temporary experience in the process of achieving my goals.

Q: Who are the climbers that inspire you the most, and why?
A: Having climbed for over 35 years, there have been many, many climbers that have and continue to inspire me today. In 1999, I was fortunate to hang out with the German climbing legend Kurt Albert in Patagonia. Kurt was the first person to develop red-point climbing style. He went on to establish hard alpine rock routes in remote ranges around the world. He was a visionary in terms of what the human body could accomplish and also had the mental determination to achieve any goal he set.

 

Q: What is your favorite climbing location, and why?
A: Wind River Range of Wyoming. I lived in Wyoming for 12 years and really enjoy the high quality granite, solitude and unlimited new route potential found there.

Q: Why Butora Climbing?
A: Innovative product design, environmental friendly materials, wide width options for my hobbit-like feet and a company run by great people.

Q: What are your favorite before and after climbing meals?
A: Coffee (it’s a meal, right? 🙂 and dark chocolate. I am currently eating a low carb high protein/fat diet and participating in intermittent fasting. I have been fortunate to be born with a high metabolism, but at 53 years young maintaining a healthy climbing weight is an important element in my climbing training program.

Q: What is your spirit animal?
A: Raccoon

 

Questions from the Internet

These are questions our visitors have asked.

David Anderson

Q: What are some tips you would give to new outdoor climbers about crag etiquette?
A: Climbing/Bouldering gyms can be crowded and noisy and user rarely have to think about the indoor “environment” as the gym has rules for safety and behavior. Outside climbing can have a much more diverse group of users in terms of skill level, experience, behaviors and values. While there are few mean spirited people in the world, I believe most folks (especially climbers) are good hearted. That being said, I think most problems at the crag stem from people not even realizing their behavior is bothering other users. If you are a dog person, or love to listen to music while you climb it might not cross your might that some people are very fearful of dogs or are distracted by music of any kind. The key is anticipating the impact of your actions and having open communications with the climbers you are sharing the rock with. In addition, mentoring new climbers in the reasons behind LNT is a responsibility that all climbers have in protecting our climbing resources

Q: Tips you would give to someone who is stuck on their project? How do you stay motivated when you are stuck?
A: I think there is value in taking a break from you project and trying something else. Early in my climbing career, I spent a lot of time projecting Killer 12.c, a long power endurance climb in Sinks Canyon, WY. I could easily do all the moves, but couldn’t link it all together. I was convinced I needed more endurance, so I did many unsuccessful burns on the route. Eventually, I took a break and spent some time working another route at the cliff, Addiction. Addiction was also 12.c, but a much shorter more bouldery route. After spending some red-pointing Addiction, I got back on Killer and sent it first go. Turns out I actually needed more power/endurance.

Q: How have you overcome fear in climbing (fear of falling, fear of failure, etc.)?
A: First, I determine if the fear is because something is actually physically dangerous. Once I know a fall is safe, then it is just a matter letting go of my personal or other peoples expectations and focus completely on the individual moves of the climb, really put weight on the foothold, tension my core, committing to the lunge etc…

Altura by Butora Rock Climbing Shoes

Ambassador Spotlight | Elan Jonas McRae

Elan Jonas McRae Butora Athlete Ambassador

Hometown: Nanaimo

Q: What’s your climbing style?
A: Crimpy and steep

Q: What is your proudest accomplishment in climbing, and outside of climbing?
A: Finishing 12th in the World Cup in Arco Italy. A lot of things that needed to come together did on the semifinal route. I have always had headspace issues and although I’ve finished higher than 12th (the World Cup in wujiang 2014) I managed to climb this route with the best headspace I’ve ever had. Outside of climbing I’m not sure.. Maybe speaking good enough mandarin to get by in every situation I faced last trip to China!

Q: What advice would you give to your first year climbing self?
A: Don’t overdue it and don’t be afraid to take more rest.

Elan Jonas McRae Butora Athlete Ambassador

Q: Who do you take advice from and why?
A: I think that I can learn from everyone. So there is nobody I wouldn’t listen to if they have some advice to offer.

Q: How has your training for climbing changed in the last year?
A: I have been resting more when my body needs it and focusing on a larger variety of moves and styles. Also I have spent some time injured with a broken hand and am still recovering. So I have had to learn to listen to my body better.

Q: How has climbing affected the people you choose to surround yourself with?
A: Most of the people close to me in my life are climbers. So I don’t think they are affected by climbing but they are there because of climbing. I think we have a stronger connection because of our shared love for the sport.

Elan Jonas McRae Butora Athlete Ambassador

Q: What have you done to give back to the climbing community?
A: I act as a role model that many younger climbers look up to. Especially in competitions. I also spend time route setting and enjoy getting to create climbs for less experienced climbers. It feels like I am sharing my knowledge with them. Finally, I have cleaned and established some boulder problems near my home on Vancouver Island that other climbers can now try.

Q: What have you learned from failure?
A: I have learned that failure isn’t always a bad thing. It is an opportunity to look at what went wrong and make changes. It has also taught me to try and keep emotions out of the mix as best as possible. So that I can be objective in looking at what went wrong.

Q: Who are the climbers that inspire you the most, and why?
A: It’s hard to just pinpoint a few climbers. But I am inspired by people who try their best in the worst conditions be it scorching heat or piles of snow. Climbers that are extremely positive. And finally, I am inspired when people go and create things be it bolting routes, cleaning boulders or hiking to new areas. I would say Adam Ondra is the essence of all that.

Q: What is your favorite climbing location, and why?
A: That’s tougher but probably Squamish. I love the texture of the rock and the subtlety of the movement. I have never climbed somewhere else where the discovery of a tiny crystal or a 3 degree drop in temperature can make such a difference.

Elan Jonas McRae Butora Athlete Ambassador

Q: Why Butora Climbing?
A: The shoes are amazing! I feel confident when I place my feet especially on technical edges and smears. And the shoes are comfortable at the same time. The people behind the brand aren’t half bad either!

Q: What are your favorite before and after climbing meals?
A: Before climbing probably nothing or a banana some days. And afterwards a rich and hearty pasta will satisfy me. I prefer to eat during climbing though to keep my energy high.

Q: What is your spirit animal?
A: Wolf

 

Questions from the Internet

These are questions our visitors have asked.

Elan Jonas McRae Butora Athlete Ambassador

Q: What differences have you found in climbing Narsha versus climbing in Acro?
A: I haven’t had the opportunity to try the Narsha yet but I’m looking forward to getting a pair this year. I love the Acro so I’m sure I’ll love the Narsha!

Q: What are some tips you would give to new outdoor climbers about crag etiquette?
A: Wipe the mud off your feet before stepping on

Q: Tips you would give to someone who is stuck on their project? How do you stay motivated when you are stuck?
A: Take some time away from it. Be ok with walking away. And then take time to train the areas holding you back. Maybe recreate the crux in the gym. You will return strong and the stress of sending will also be eliminated.

Q: How have you overcome fear in climbing (fear of falling, fear of failure, etc.)?
A: I wouldn’t say I have overcome fear. It is always there in some form. But I’ve taught myself to handle it by trusting my ability and trusting the belayers/spotters.

Butora Acro Rock Climbing Shoes

Ambassador Spotlight | Will Kelly

Butora Ambassador Will Kelly

Hometown: Columbus, Ohio

Q: What’s your climbing style?
A: Powerful

Q: What is your proudest accomplishment in climbing, and outside of climbing?
A: Climbing my first 5.13, and maintaining a 4.0 gpa

Q: What advice would you give to your first year climbing self?
A: That the mental side of Climbing is everything.

Q: Who do you take advice from and why?
A: My dad, because he cares deeply about climbing, has been doing it for years, and knows his stuff!

Butora Ambassador Will Kelly

Q: How has your training for climbing changed in the last year?
A: I’ve shifted from a linear periodization format to a non-linear periodization format with an emphasis on any particular weakness during a four week cycle, as well as incorporating more stretching into my training.

Q: How has climbing affected the people you choose to surround yourself with?
A: It has obviously caused me to surround myself with others who climb, but also, since climbing has forced me to learn more about psychology in terms of positive and negative beliefs, I try and hang out with those who stay positive.

Q: What have you done to give back to the climbing community?
A: I love participating in the adaptive ascents clinic at my local gym, which works to help introduce climbing to those with disabilities, and I’m planning on volunteering as an assistant coach on the adaptive ascents team in the upcoming months.

Q: What have you learned from failure?
A: I’ve learned that failure is necessary for reaching success, and that it is the only way I can discover what my weaknesses are.

Q: Who are the climbers that inspire you the most, and why?
A: Alex Megos, because he seems like he climbs confident and smooth no matter the situation.

Butora Ambassador Will KellyQ: What is your favorite climbing location, and why?
A: Red River Gorge, because it’s the best climbing on Earth..

Q: Why Butora Climbing?
A: Because I appreciate their drive to innovate the climbing shoe industry, and their willingness to experiment with new things, and I think I have a little bit of that in myself

Q: What are your favorite before and after climbing meals?
A: Before: A breakfast burrito After: An Ale 8

Q: What is your spirit animal?
A: A Liger, because they’re bred for their skills in magic.

 

Questions from the Internet

These are questions our visitors have asked.

 

Butora Ambassador Will KellyQ: What differences have you found in climbing Narsha versus climbing in Acro?
A: I’ve found that the Narsha tends to be on the stiffer side, and excels on steeper terrain that involves tiny feet, while the Acro has a little more flex, and is my go to shoe for long sport climbs or anything involving a more slopey foot.

Q: What are some tips you would give to new outdoor climbers about crag etiquette?
A: Please bury your poop, and if you’re uncomfortable in a situation ask for help.

Q: Tips you would give to someone who is stuck on their project? How do you stay motivated when you are stuck?
A: As a person who enjoys a good project sesh, sometimes you just have to measure your progress in inches, and take the occasional break.

Q: How have you overcome fear in climbing (fear of falling, fear of failure, etc.)?
A: A lot of fears can be broken down into what you see as a risk. By fact checking and looking at the situation from a different perspective, you can identify that risk as either being a rational one or an irrational one..

Butora Acro Rock Climbing Shoes

Ambassador Spotlight | Szu-ting Yi

Szu-Ting Yi Butora Athlete Ambassador

Hometown: Taiwan

Q: What’s your climbing style?
A: Trad climbing, Alpine climbing

Q: What is your proudest accomplishment in climbing, and outside of climbing?
A: Several alpine first ascents; climbed 40 desert towers in a season in 2015; got a PhD in computer science at University of Pennsylvania

Q: What advice would you give to your first year climbing self?
A: Get some solid movement lessons from a climbing coach. Start bouldering as soon as possible.

Q: Who do you take advice from and why?
A: I haven’t have a particular person in mind.

Szu-Ting Yi Butora Athlete Ambassador

Q: How has your training for climbing changed in the last year?
A: I dedicated more time on indoor bouldering and start a non-linear strength training program.

Q: How has climbing affected the people you choose to surround yourself with?
A: Climbing makes me to have more friends who are progressive thinking, open minded, and inquisitive.

Q: What have you done to give back to the climbing community?
A: I have written a couple climbing instructional books and gave classes on traditional climbing. I also have a blog sharing my climbing stories and reflections.

Q: What have you learned from failure?
A: I learned to dissect failures. This way a failure is not just a failure but useful information. And by looking carefully into information, I got more reliable self evaluation and can adjust my goals accordingly.

Szu-Ting Yi Butora Athlete Ambassador

Q: Who are the climbers that inspire you the most, and why?
A: Mostly any bad ass trad/alpine female climbers, because I am just that. and there’re not many role models out there.

Q: What is your favorite climbing location, and why?
A: Desert Southwest. it’s simply beautiful and I like sandstone crack climbing.

Q: Why Butora Climbing?
A: I love crack climbing and Butora Alturas are the best crack climbing shoes I’ve ever worn.

Q: What are your favorite before and after climbing meals?
A: Home-made omelettes loaded with vegetables and cheese. Hot soup with chucks of meat.

Q: What is your spirit animal?
A: Cats

Szu-Ting Yi Butora Athlete Ambassador

Questions from the Internet

These are questions our visitors have asked.

 

Q: What differences have you found in climbing Narsha versus climbing in Acro?
A: I haven’t had any experience on Narshas.

Q: What are some tips you would give to new outdoor climbers about crag etiquette?
A: Pack out whatever you pack in and don’t play music loudly.

Q: Tips you would give to someone who is stuck on their project? How do you stay motivated when you are stuck?
A: Try something different or put it aside for a while and climb something else fun and come back later.

Q: How have you overcome fear in climbing (fear of falling, fear of failure, etc.)?
A: Try to focus on what I was doing at the moment. Stay focused and stay present.

Altura by Butora Rock Climbing Shoes

Athletic Diet: Everything Rock Climbers Need to Know About Nutrition

Athletic Diet

Are you a rock climbing enthusiast looking for the proper diet for your hobby? Or, maybe you’re a beginner who’d like to know what the best meal to have while training?

Eating the right food in the right amount can do wonders for your strength and endurance.

Keep reading to discover what you should eat and how to maintain a nutrient-packed diet to fuel your adventures.

 

Athletic Diet for Rock Climbers: The Essentials

Rock climbing is a strenuous activity and requires a high level of mental and physical preparation. Regular training and a healthy diet play equal roles in keeping you fit.

Wonder what athletes should eat?

 

Here are the basics you need to know about maintaining a healthy athletic diet:

 

Embrace the Complex Carbohydrates

The best diet for athletes in training, including rock climbers, must include at least 40% of complex carbohydrates.

They’re a significant source of long-lasting energy that helps your body maintain strength and brain power.

Some of the best complex carbs for your diet are:

  • Wholemeal bread and pastries
  • Nuts and seeds
  • Brown rice
  • Quinoa
  • Fruits (blueberries, bananas)
  • Green veggies (spinach, kale, broccoli)
  • Starchy veggies (regular and sweet potatoes, green peas)

Stay on Track with the Protein

Every diet and nutrition for athletes and rock climbers must be made of at least 30% protein. Protein is a building block for your muscles and a source of fuel for your body.

The best high-protein foods to implement in your diet are:

  • Lean meat (poultry, fish, lean red meat)
  • Eggs
  • Legumes
  • Low-fat cheese
  • Nuts and seeds
  • Peanut butter
  • Chickpeas
  • Chia seeds

Keep the Fat in Check

When creating a sports diet, athletes shouldn’t consume too much fat. Though healthy fats are a vital source of energy, their primary role is to slow down the process of digestion.

When you eat a particular athlete’s diet, your goal is to accumulate long-lasting energy. If complex carbs are your primary energy source, fats may prevent them from digesting thoroughly. This will cut down ontheir efficacy, and you’ll need to make up with more calories.

A rock climber’s diet should consist of 25-30 % fat at the most, depending on your activities.

The best foods with healthy fats are:

  • Avocados
  • Coconut and its products
  • Olive oil and olives
  • Grass-fed butter
  • Nuts
  • Ground flaxseed
  • Raw cacao nibs and dark chocolates
  • Fatty fish (tuna, mackerel, salmon)

Stay Hydrated

Healthy eating for athletes is just one side of the coin. Staying hydrated throughout your training and climbing is the other.

Rock climbing isn’t easy, no matter how experienced you are. Whenever you lose water through sweating and physical strain, your body loses electrolytes. You have to replenish them as soon as possible to prevent muscle cramps, fatigue, and dehydration.

Aside from water, you can stay hydrated with coconut water, chia lemon water, green smoothies, and milk.

Keep Your Body and Mind Healthy and Prepared for Rock Climbing

Climbing is your passion and each time you want to show up better than the next. These tips will help you follow an athletic diet and adapt it to your rock-climbing lifestyle.

Ready for a new pair of climbing shoes? Check out our collection and choose the perfect fit for your needs.

Have questions? Contact us today and let us know how we can help.

Ambassador Spotlight | Tyler Weiss

Hometown: Raleigh, NC

Q: What’s your climbing style?
A: Crimps, lock-offs, static movement/tension blocs, and I have most my success on walls up to 60 degrees.

Q: What is your proudest accomplishment in climbing, and outside of climbing?
A: Becoming the lead setter for Triangle Rock Club. Climbing Kill onsight V12 at the Happies in Bishop, CA. Becoming an ambassador for Butora climbing.

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